First They Came (21st Century Rehash)

First They Came for the 21st Century Rehash:

 

First they came for the Day Care Centres,

But I didn’t have children, so I didn’t stand up.

Then they came for the Libraries,

But I read online, so I didn’t stand up.

Then they came for Meals on Wheels and Home Care,

But I wasn’t a Pensioner, so I didn’t stand up.

Then they came for Advice and Leisure Centres,

But I never used them, so I didn’t stand up.

Then they came for Social Care and Career Services,

But I didn’t need them, so I didn’t stand up.

Then they came for the Tuition Fees,

But I wasn’t a student, so I didn’t stand up.

Then they came for the Illegal Immigrants,

But I wasn’t an Illegal Immigrant, so I didn’t stand up.

Then they came for the Asylum Seekers,

But I wasn’t an Asylum Seeker, so I didn’t stand up.

Then they came for the NHS,

But they told me they were improving it, so I didn’t stand up.

Then they came for those on Benefits,

But I wasn’t on benefits, so I didn’t stand up.

Then they came for the Non-EU Immigrants,

But I wasn’t a Non-EU Immigrant, so I didn’t stand up.

Then they came for the Disabled,

But I didn’t have a handicap, so I didn’t stand up.

Then they came for 20-somethings,

But I wasn’t in my 20s, so I didn’t stand up.

Then they came for Human Rights,

And I asked myself: “where are the marchers and protesters?”

But there was no one else left.

 

A couple of days ago, it was National Poetry Day. I’m not convinced I got everything in the right order in which it has happened (or may happen, in the case of the last few lines, should the UK Conservative Party win the next election in 2015 and make good on their threats/promises), but it sums up my thoughts rather well. It’s blatant parody of the original poem (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_they_came_… in its multiple renditions), I won’t even pretend that it’s even a good parody at that, but that’s where I’m at.

I’ve touched on this before in a previous post, so forgive me for being repetitive, but this is important. I don’t endorse or even suggest it, but a part of me is seriously wondering: why, the heck, are people not rioting in the streets in front of Parliament right now? The British people cannot be divorced from their wits to not realise that it is their rights and freedoms that are being systematically stripped away in the name of safety.

Would this even happen in the states? I want to say that I doubt it (just judging from how protective gun owners are there, but I may be wrong), after all, the United States is was the home of Benjamin Franklin who once wrote: “They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety.” (http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Benjamin_Franklin)

But Americans do not corner this market, because it was Sir William Blackstone, an English Jurist, who wrote: “It is better that ten guilty persons escape than that one innocent suffer.” (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blackstone’s_formulation)

Why are these people relevant? Because if Theresa May is to be believed, the reason for stripping the UK people of their Human Rights (see: essential liberty) is to render it easier to deport “criminals” (see: temporary safety). It is vital that we have a justice system that is Innocent until proven guilty, as  the alternative means, for the sake of locking up one who is guilty with lack of evidence, we must also resort to locking up ten others who are innocent.

Why aren’t there riots in the streets? Why aren’t they being publicly condemned? Where is the outcry from the populous?

In what warped and twisted, acid-tripped delusion is this even remotely close to imitating acceptability?

There will be some who will appease to the better natures of humanity by thinking positive and saying: even if the laws aren’t there, people wouldn’t dare do that to fellow citizens.

Without the laws, how can you be sure? You can’t; you literally have no guarantee that your rights will be protected. That is the point of having laws – not to punish the guilty, but to protect the innocent.

If a nation fails to do that much, then they are not worthy of their own sovereignty and any group of people that allows their government to do so without protest…

There are no words, why – in the names of your parents, grandparents, great grandparents, brothers, sisters, children, grandchildren, your friends, their families – why isn’t the media in a furious outcry against this?

Because protests are happening: the NHS protest last week had over 50,000 people turn up to march in Manchester (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-manchester-24286582)  and some 2,000 schools had teachers turn out for the TeacherRoar (http://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/news/uk-news/teachers-one-day-strike-over-pay-6119194). But where is the media? Why aren’t they screaming this from the rooftops? You have to go digging to find news about either one.

Don’t let them be snuffed out, don’t let it go unnoticed. Tweet and share the protests going on RIGHT NOW (yes, this second), call the media, MAKE THEM show up. On Twitter there are several protests going on under #roadblocks4justice (https://twitter.com/search?q=%23blocks4justice&src=hash there is a live stream of one such protest here: http://bambuser.com/v/3984396).

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